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Is it Normal to Feel Sore After Sex – What Causes Sore Vagina and How to Treat It

  • Jun.09.2021
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what does it mean when your vagina is sore

What Does It Mean If You Have a Sore Vagina after Sex?

Many women at some point in their life, if not frequently, will experience having a sore vag after intercourse. Although unpleasant, this phenomenon is not typically dangerous and shouldn’t last for very long. Being sore after sex is common, and it happens most often after rough sex, sex without adequate lubrication, or sex that lasts for a long period of time. There are instances when a sore vagina is indicative of a larger issue, so it is important to rule out other problems when experiencing after sex soreness.

Is It Normal to Feel Sore after Sex?

While it can be perfectly normal and non-threatening to have soreness after sex, it is important to distinguish between vaginal discomfort after sex, pelvic pain, and vulva pain after sex in order to know how to treat your symptoms. Many people refer to the entire female reproductive system as the “vagina” while in reality feeling pain in the vulva, the vaginal canal, or pelvic cramps can be completely different situations. The vagina is the term for the vaginal canal, which is the muscular orifice that goes from the vaginal opening to the cervix. The vulva is the external part of the female genitalia that includes the clitoris, the labia minora and labia majora, the urethra, and the clitoral hood. It can be normal to feel pain in the vulva or the vagina after sex, but depending on which one and if there are other symptoms it could be an indicator of different problems which would need specific treatment.

After Sex Soreness Remedies

sore vagina treatment

Remedies for soreness will differ depending on what exactly is going on. In order to figure out exactly how to treat your soreness, you will need to figure out what is causing the soreness and where the soreness is most acute. Here are some reasons why you might be feeling vaginal or vulvar soreness or vulvar or vaginal inflammation after sex and what to do about it.

How You’re Having Sex

If you find yourself asking “Why is my vagina sore after sex?” It is possible that you might not have realized you were irritating your vagina in the process of penetration. This could either be because you were having fun, you were anxious, or you didn’t know how to tell your partner that your vagina was hurting. There are many reasons that you might have a sore vaginal canal after having sex that shouldn’t indicate a bigger issue and can be remedied easily. Some ways of having sex that could cause a sore vagina are not enough lube, sex that is rough, or sex that lasts a long time. While these are all certainly reasons for sore vagina, it is important to rule out other issues by making sure that you are only having sore vagina symptoms that don’t last for very long, and you don’t have other distressing symptoms. If you are merely feeling muscle soreness, you don’t have to worry about it being an emergency. This may just mean that you have been having sex for a long time and your vaginal muscles are tired. There are also factors in penetration that can make your vagina raw after sex. If your vagina throbs after sex and feels raw, it may be an indicator that you need more lubrication for penetration. You should always make sure that the vagina is aroused before having a penis in vagina sex, otherwise, you may wind up with a painful experience and/or a swollen sore vagina after sex.

What to Do for a Sore Vagina

If it does happen, let’s talk about what to do for a sore vagina. Firstly, make sure to tell your partner if you are experiencing pain during sex. If it is an issue of lack of lubrication, you can stop, apply a water based lube and continue, or switch up your activity to manual or oral stimulation. If your partner is too rough during sex, let them know that they need to be more gentle with you. If you enjoy the roughness, make sure that you are using enough lube and understand that this very well may make you sore after. Some say the best sore vagina treatment is simply an ice pack and rest. If your vagina remains sore for more than 24 hours after having sex, this may indicate a bigger issue.

Soreness That Would Require Treatment

sore vagina after sex

There are some instances when having a sore vagina or vulva after sex may be a sign that there is something going on with your body that requires medical treatment. If you have extreme pain, this is a sign that you may need to see a doctor immediately. If you have soreness along with other symptoms, you should make an appointment to see your doctor to rule out any infections or other health problems. If you are experiencing pain or soreness that doesn’t go away or is combined with other symptoms, it might be one of the following ailments.

Urinary Tract Infection

If you have pain while urinating, a frequent urge to urinate without any urine coming out, as well as a sore vagina or irritated pelvic area, this may mean you have a urinary tract infection. UTIs are common and can be easily treated with antibiotics. It is important to treat urinary tract infections quickly and fully so that they do not progress into a larger infection that could be more dangerous for your health. UTIs can happen when bacteria gets into the urethra and urinary tract. A good way to avoid getting a UTI when sexually active is to urinate after sex to push any bacteria out of the urethral opening.

Yeast Infection

Yeast infections occur when the naturally occurring yeast in your vagina overgrows and causes symptoms such as itching, pain in the vulva or vagina, pain or discomfort during intercourse, and/or white clumpy discharge. Yeast infections can be treated with antifungal medications and are also quite common. Some yeast infections go away on their own, but it is better to treat a yeast infection to ensure that it doesn’t linger for a long time. Yeast infections can be caused by many things including wearing a wet bathing suit for too long, not bathing frequently enough, stress, excessive sweating, and high sugar intake.

An Allergic Reaction

vaginal discomfort after sex

Soreness, discomfort, or pain can also come from an allergic reaction to condoms, lubricants, soaps, perfumes, or laundry detergents. If you are using a new product that comes in contact with your vagina or vulva, and you have new pain or discomfort, discontinue the use of this product and see if you get any better. When it comes to condoms, some people are more sensitive than others. You can buy sensitive skin condoms or latex-free condoms if you are allergic to latex. A latex allergy doesn’t have to prevent you from being able to have safe sex. If you do not use condoms, you are putting yourself at risk for infection with an STI.

STIs

There are many STIs such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis which can cause pelvic pain, vaginal or vulvar pain or discomfort, and pain during intercourse. These STIs sometimes can also cause unusual discharge that is yellow or green and might have a foul odor. If you are experiencing unexplained pain and discomfort, you should get yourself tested for STIs. If you do have one of the STIs listed above, the treatment is typically a simple course of oral antibiotics. If you avoid getting tested and treated, your STI could progress into a more dangerous infection.

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